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2021-2022 College Catalog

Online Catalog

PHIL 201 Religions of the World

A study of the major religions of the world, through exploration of their worldviews, core values, beliefs, and sacred texts, with emphasis on their role in guiding the enduring and contemporary search for meaning. Focus is on Primal Religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Credits

3

Prerequisite

Eligible to enroll in ENGL 121

Hours Weekly

3

Course Objectives

  1. Identify the human search for meaning and ethical living as expressed in the worldviews and core beliefs of eleven religions and organize understanding by recognizing the central narrative and key concepts within each tradition.
  2. Consider the possibilities available in religious traditions by viewing them as repositories of wisdom in the search for meaning and the clarification of one’s own personal core beliefs and values with respect to human nature, the human community, the natural environment, and ultimate reality.
  3. Analyze and evaluate the ethical values central to each tradition by reading, reflecting on, and writing about selections from the scriptures of each of the eleven traditions and, on one occasion, by leading a small group discussion of five scriptures from a particular tradition.
  4. Apply intellectual understandings by imaginatively stepping inside the mind of a person from a religious tradition that is not one’s own and reflecting on how that person might see the world, especially the ethical choices being made by people in America/Maryland/Columbia.

Course Objectives

  1. Identify the human search for meaning and ethical living as expressed in the worldviews and core beliefs of eleven religions and organize understanding by recognizing the central narrative and key concepts within each tradition.

    Learning Activity Artifact

    • Other (please fill out box below)
    • Three unit tests

    Procedure for Assessing Student Learning

    • Critical and Creative Thinking Rubric

    Critical Thinking

    • CT1

    Ethics Goals

    • ET1
  2. Consider the possibilities available in religious traditions by viewing them as repositories of wisdom in the search for meaning and the clarification of one’s own personal core beliefs and values with respect to human nature, the human community, the natural environment, and ultimate reality.

    Learning Activity Artifact

    • Other (please fill out box below)
    • Capstone analytic paper

    Procedure for Assessing Student Learning

    • Critical and Creative Thinking Rubric

    Critical Thinking

    • CT2

    Ethics Goals

    • ET2
  3. Analyze and evaluate the ethical values central to each tradition by reading, reflecting on, and writing about selections from the scriptures of each of the eleven traditions and, on one occasion, by leading a small group discussion of five scriptures from a particular tradition.

    Learning Activity Artifact

    • Other (please fill out box below)
    • Scripture group leadership

    Procedure for Assessing Student Learning

    • Critical and Creative Thinking Rubric

    Critical Thinking

    • CT3

    Ethics Goals

    • ET1
  4. Apply intellectual understandings by imaginatively stepping inside the mind of a person from a religious tradition that is not one’s own and reflecting on how that person might see the world, especially the ethical choices being made by people in America/Maryland/Columbia.

    Learning Activity Artifact

    • Other (please fill out box below)
    • Reflective paper

    Procedure for Assessing Student Learning

    • Critical and Creative Thinking Rubric

    Critical Thinking

    • CT4

    Ethics Goals

    • ET3